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2002-2003 Interfaith Speaker Series: Religious Lawyering: Against the Tide?


This series explored various ways in which religious values may challenge judges and attorneys to swim against the tide of established legal practice or professional standards.

A Religious Sense of Time in Today's Legal Practice (March 2003)

Conversation with:
Professor Suzanne Last Stone, Professor of Law at Cardozo School of Law.

Reading:
M. Cathleen Kaveny, "Billable Hours in Ordinary Time: A Theological Critique of the Instrumentation of Time in Professional Life," 33 Loyola U. Chic. L. J. 173 (2001)

Representing Unpopular Clients (January 2003)

Conversation with:
Doug Ammar, Esq., Executive Director of the Georgia Justice Project in Atlanta Georgia.

Reading:
Abbe Smith & William Montrose, "The Calling of Criminal Defense," 50 Mercer L. Rev. 443 (1999).

The Moral and Religious Dimensions of Client Counseling (October 2002)

Conversation:
Professor Howard Lesnick, the Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania.

Reading:
Howard Lesnick, "The Religious Lawyer in a Pluralist Society," 66 Fordham L. Rev. 1469 (March 1998)
Joseph Allegretti, "Lawyers, Clients and Covenant: A Religious Perspective on Legal Practice and Ethics," 66 Fordham L. Rev. 1101 (March 1998)
Russell G. Pearce, "Model Rule 1.0: Lawyers are Morally Accountable," 70 Fordham L. Rev. 1805 (April 2002)
Roy D. Simon, "Legal Ethics Advisors and the Interest of Justice: Is an Ethics Advisor a Conscience or a Co-Conspirator?" 70 Fordham L. Rev. 1869 (April 2002)
Sanford Levinson, "The Lawyer as Moral Counselor: How Much Should the Client Be Expected to Pay?" 77 Notre Dame L. Rev 831 (March 2002)